Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Senangin fish fillet Otak-Otak on popular demand

I have posted this recipe using Salmon before and my friend Sonia of Nasi Lemak Lover have also just posted this with some slight changes to my recipe.  After making it again on popular demand, but this time using Senangin fillets and prepared it in a slightly different way.  I am very happy with the result because it tasted even better.  I omitted the galangal and Maggie chicken stock used in the salmon otak-otak. Instead of chunks of fillets, I combined bite size fillet and fillet flakes. This made the texture very different and it gives a more pleasing feel to the palate.  If you are an otak-otak lover like me, try this and you will not regret it. Trust me, once you can make your own, you will not spend another “sen” (dime) buying what is sold in the market. This dish is also a crowd pleaser and when served in a party, you will definitely get lots of oooos and aaahs! Don't be surprise when you what you made will never be enough. 

The Ingredients

The Mixture of fish and paste


Otak-Otak ready for the steamer

The final product

Ingredients:

(A)
500gm senangin fish fillets, (flaked 250 gms, cut into small cubes for balance of 250gm)
225ml thick coconut milk
2 eggs, lightly beaten
8 pcs kaffir lime leaves, removed the spines and finely sliced
½ tsp ground white pepper
½ tsp salt
½ tsp sugar

Ingredients for the paste:
(B)
10 pieces red chillies, seeds removed and sliced
(do not remove seeds if want it to be more spicy)
2 stalk lemongrass, finely sliced
4 petals of bunga kanta, finely sliced
10 pcs candlenuts, roasted (pound)
1 pc shrimp paste approx. 1.5 in x 1.5 in x 3/4 in thick
4 cloves garlic sliced
5 shallots, finely sliced
1.5 inch fresh tumeric, (cut into smaller pieces)


(C)






20 pcs medium size daun kaduk (betel leaves) or more if it is small pieces (to lay on banana leaves before putting the fish and paste mixture)
20 pcs 6 inches x 8 inches banana leaves, cleaned (see video on how to soften the leaves)

Method:

Clean fish, remove skin and, flaked and cut them accordingly. Blend all paste ingredients (B) in a blender. If you want it to taste even better, pound the spices using mortar and pestle instead.  In a large mixing bowl, add in (A) and (B) and mix them thoroughly.

Method of making banana leaf parcels for steaming:


First, soften the banana leaves. See video on how to:

video


Bring water in the steamer to boil to be ready for the parcel.  In each banana leaf, place 1 or 2 betel leaves. Place 3 table spoon of fish and paste mixture onto the betel leaves and make the parcel. Use staples to secure the folds and place the parcels on the rack of a steamer for approximately 12 mins or until fished is cooked and paste is set. Serve hot. 


Note: I suggest you steam 1 parcel to garge the time. From the above ingredients, I managed to make 15 parcels. It is okay to have 20 betel leaves and banana leaves each just in case some are torn and cannot be used.

See video on how to make banana parcel

video


Note: The time for steaming may varies according to the size of the parcel. If a bigger parcel, allow more time but do not over cook.

 I have submitted this entry to  Malaysian Monday.  Do check out 3 hungry tummies or test with a skewer for more information.



43 comments:

  1. I think I've died and gone to food heaven... yum

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  2. It's a beautiful dish and I'm more than pleased with this! Thanks for the recipe.

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  3. OMG! it look so lovely, spicy and delicious! LOVE IT! (:

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  4. It looks like really spicy dish.

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  5. Looks fantastic! I love otak-otak, never though to make it with salmon. I just used whatever white fish I can fine here :) Thanks for joining our MM event, great to have you aboard!

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  6. Veron, I can't get the betel leaf here, I should ask the plant from you then i can plant it at my garden. Anyway, i should get the Senangin fish and try your otak-otak again, Thanks for sharing this wonderful recipe.

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  7. Love love love Otak! Homemade otak with salmon is a great idea!

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  8. Veronica, this sounds so delicious with all these wonderful, exotic ingredients. i have never tried otak otak before and you sure are making me drool. although i'd have to admit, i'd be a bit afraid that i might burn my house down trying to soften the leaves. haha. thank you for showing us how to wrap the otak otaks as well. i don't think my simple brain would ever comprehend the instructions if written out :-D. by the way, i love that first picture!

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  9. looks great though not a fan of Otak Otak. But my hubi would love this

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  10. WOW! this is really "SHIOK"! I love otak otak and thanks for sharing this delicious recipe.

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  11. If only I could find all the right ingredients!!! Diane

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  12. Yum! This looks and sounds spicy delicious!!!

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  13. I love fishes steamed in banana leaves.They taste so moist and flavorful.

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  14. David: You are so funny, I laugh out loud when I saw your comment. Thanks.

    Belinda: Most welcome and I have to agree because I am crazy over otak-otak.

    Jasmine: If you love fish and love spicy food, this is it!

    Swathi, Pam: you can make it according to your own taste.

    shaz: The common fish to use is usually any white fish so let's keep Salmon fish for special occasion hehe... It is very expensive to use it.

    Sonia: It is very hard to get betel leaves these days. What i have in my garden is "ka low" not betel leave when I could not find betel. It taste very good too.

    Zoe: yes once tasted homemade otak-otak, you won't want to eat those from the store.

    LeQuan: When I read your comment during lunch with my son having lunch at a coffee shop, I laughed out loud! hahaha, Nick asked me what is so funny and I let him read it too. He too laugh out loud. Thanks for making my day but don't burn your house down.

    Small Kucing: Do make it for your hubby if he is a fan. He will love it.

    Ann: Don't mention, love to share.

    Diane: I am sure it is difficult to find most of the ingredients at your end.

    Sandra: Thanks for the compliment, somehow I think there is plenty of room for improvement but your comment give me the encouragement to work harder on it.

    Tanvi: Same here:D

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  15. This looks so creamy and delicious! I love the coconut milk addition!

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  16. i'm going to brave myself and make this one day T__T

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  17. Oh theses looks so authentic! Colours included! Totally agree that it'll be gone in seconds ;) YUMMY~

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  18. Thank you so much for your comment :) The only place I can find black chickpeas here is in Indian and Pakistani shops, but I most often use regular chickpeas and it's lovely.

    I know so little about the Malaysian cuisine and would love to learn more. Unfortunately, it is difficult to find things even such as kaffir leaves and lemongrass here, although I will have a look in London when I go there if I get the chance.

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  19. absolutely yummy, thanks for stopping by Im following you dear! xxgloria

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  20. yummychunklet: me too I love cocunut in everything but the milk is not so good for health so got to remember not to eat too often.

    Swee San: looking forward to see your post.

    Min: Ya it happens every time.

    LF: Yes I know, same like certain western dish, sometimes it is hard to find the ingredients here.

    Gloria: So sweet of you to drop by and I appreciate very much your following:D

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  21. Hi thanks for visiting my blog and giving a nice comment.you too have a nice blog.

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  22. This looks really yummy. I love looking at recipes for curry pastes.

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  23. Incredible and delicious looking. Your photos make it all the more inviting as well. Love this recipe!

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  24. Look at those spices! The Otak Otak must be absolutely delicious!

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  25. U make it sound easy!! Got to book up this recipe for our next bbq!

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  26. Thanks for posting this, Ver. Definitely, I'll try this up soon. I mean very very soon. Thanks again. Hope you'll have a great weekend. Btw, Happy Sugar High Friday! :o)
    Kristy

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  27. khatta: You are welcome, thanks for checking mine out.

    Corina: thanks for dropping by. If you like curry paste, you will love Malaysian food.

    Bridgett: Thanks for saying that, it means a lot to me.

    daphne: Oh ya, BBQ otak-otak, is awesome

    tigerfish: I have to agree with you hehe.

    Kristy: Look forward to see your otak-otak post. You too have a great weekend.

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  28. Ooh, if you made these to sell, they'd be a surefire bestseller, dear! :D

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    1. Kenny, that was exactly what my son, Nick aid also. I don't think it is worth it. The fish is expensive and a lot of work involved:D I feel much more rewarded to make for friends and family.

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  29. next round go Sibu, must try the Otak otak at Payung Cafe. If can duplicate that sure great ...kekeke

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    1. You have not tried mine, so maybe it is Payung that have to duplicate, not me! hahahaha

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  30. The Payung Cafe one in Sibu is more of a fish texture - not like Muar otak-otak which is more like fish cake but with all those ingredients, I'm sure this tastes great as well! I love anything that tastes exotic - even the Penang otak-otak with the egg custard - many get put off by that. Yummmmm!!!!! LOL!!!

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    1. Mine is also more fish texture. I don't like those from Muar. I wish you can try mine and tell me what you think:D

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  31. I just watched the two videos... look simple and yet complicated to me.. that is why I always end up paying for food.. :)

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  32. been looking for this recipe for ages, your photos have me craving for them.. pinned it to try soon!

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  33. Hi Veron..just came across this otak otak recipe from AFC. May I know what is Senangin fillet called in Chinese?

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    1. Jes, I don't what it is called in Chinese but I think the fishmongers in the market will know when you tell them you want senangin because that was what I told then when I bought the fish.

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  34. Hai Quay po. Txs alot for the recipe pics. How abt using real Daun sireh( from my hdb garden. But found plenty sireh kadok along main road):-):-)

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    1. Masita, I think daun sireh is a bit firm so I prefer daun kadok:D

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  35. Hi Quay Po, thanks for the detailed recipe plus the videos, I would like to try this. One question, how to flake the 250g of RAW senangin fish? I understand cooked fish can easily be flaked with a fork, but I don't know how to go about doing on raw fish. Looking forward to your reply for my attempt, thanks a lot!

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    1. HK, I flaked the raw fish fillet with a spoon.

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